Archive

Posts Tagged ‘flower cane’

How Does Your (Polymer Clay) Garden Grow?

I can’t stop making polymer clay flower canes!

This is my latest batch of brooches and pendants:

red & white polymer clay flower brooch

red & white polymer clay flower brooch

purple polymer clay flower brooch with acrylic cabochon

purple polymer clay flower brooch with acrylic cabochon

purple polymer clay petunia brooch with acrylic cabochon

purple petunia brooch. I have no idea if I’ll ever be able to recreate this cane!

purple polymer clay petunia brooch with acrylic cabochon

purple polymer clay petunia brooch with acrylic cabochon

'Fire flower' polymer clay brooch with acrylic cabochon

‘Fire flower’ polymer clay brooch with acrylic cabochon

'Fire flower' polymer clay brooch with acrylic cabochon

‘Fire flower’ polymer clay brooch with acrylic cabochon

Flowering Flower-ring

In the last month or so, I’ve had a step-by-step article published in “Making Jewellery” magazine, which involved a flower ring…

Image

…and also included a couple of ‘bonus’ earrings:

Image

and they also included a picture of a purple ring as well:

Image

Here is a scan of the cover of the magazine:

Image

… and here is an idea of what the first page of the article looked like:

polymer clay flower ring

Somehow they seem to make the pieces look better than in real life!

Polymer Clay Flower Brooches

November 26, 2012 Leave a comment

Now that I’ve got the hang of making polymer clay flower canes I’ve been wondering what to do with them. I decided to experiment with brooches:

Image

and here is a slightly closer look:

Image

100 Days of Polymer Clay Necklaces: “73”

73 days to go until the polymer clay cruise – and here is the latest necklace in my “100 Days” challenge

This time I’ve made a beaded necklace with a blue flower focal bead, with other beads dangling from it:

I wish my photography was better, because these photos make it look like a greeny-brown thing that I’ve dredged up from the bottom of a pond. But in real life it’s not that bad!

100 Days of Polymer Clay Necklaces: “74”

74 days to go until the polymer clay cruise – and here is the latest necklace in my “100 Days” challenge

Just a quick one today, as I’ve started to mark A-level papers. For the next couple of weeks I will simultaneously be marking exams and working on my own MSc project (as well as making a necklace per day), so I may have to come up with some more quick necklaces in the meantime…

Anyway, this necklace is made up of three blue flower beads secured in place with tiny metal crimps on either side, plus some glass beads that are just held in place by knots:

“Breakthrough” Backgroundless Polymer Clay Cane Technique…

September 8, 2010 Leave a comment

Over the last few months I have been hearing a buzz about a new technique in polymer clay cane-making.

As Naama Zamir (founder of the Israeli Polymer Clay Guild) described it in the title of one of her blog entries, this technique is “A Breakthrough” for polymer clay cane-makers; in fact it is such a revolutionary technique that already it is gaining almost legendary status – up there on a level with “The Skinner Blend”.

I first noticed some references to a new ‘backgroundless’ technique in the Spring of 2010, and was intrigued by how excited the authors were to discover it. Trying to track down the source of this brilliant method (and to find out what it actually was), I attempted to trace it back through various cryptic and secretive references that I encountered in the blogs and websites, but kept coming to a dead end.

However, by Summer 2010 the trickle of references had become a steady stream, and I was finally tipped off by Penny Vingoe’s “Clayaround” newsletter, which pointed to this blog: http://naamazamir.blogspot.com/2009/05/breakthrough.html. At last! I could tell I was getting closer to the original source! It appeared that Edith Fischer-Katz (“Zoota” on the etsy site) was the inventor/developer of the backgroundless technique.

I contacted her today to ask if (a) she really was the original inventor, and (b) if she would be happy to participate in an email ‘interview’ to be published on the BPCG website, and she replied “yes” on both counts. So as soon as the email interview has been conducted, it will be shared with BPCG members on their website. I am really looking forward to it.

“But wait – what the heck is this fantastic new technique?” I hear you ask. Well, until now the usual way of reducing a non-round (e.g. flower) cane has been sort of grab both ends of the cane and just pull (which does result in very nice beads, but they are often inconsistent sizes, as the cane can become rather lumpy and often gets very thin in the middle and remains very thick at the ends). Even with very experienced cane-makers, the ends of the cane are often squished out of recognition, and need to be consigned to the growing pile of scrap clay (as shown in the photo below):

wonky flower cane

wonky flower cane

…but now Edith has provided the answer. Suitable even for beginners, the ‘backgroundless’ technique is a brilliant way of reducing a cane and keeping crisp edges and a consistent cane diameter, and results in far less clay going into the scrap pile. This new way involves wrapping the cane in Play-Doh and then an outer layer of scrap clay. Edith pointed me to a YouTube video which demonstrates it, which was created by her friend Yonat Dascalu: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ecS_Sa0KbM&feature=player_embedded#

Wow! This month I have been in contact with polymer clay royalty! First Cat Therien (yes – THE Cat Therien) commented on one of my blog entries, and now I have had the opportunity to have an email chat with Edith, The Inventor Of The Most Exciting Polyclay Thing Since The Skinner Blend.

I shall die happy now.